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Protect Yourself

UBI has found that many people don't follow best practice, or think they do when it comes to personal identity security. Here, we will give you tips on protecting yourself and your data.

If you're here inquiring about some seemingly shady request for information you've gotten about your UBI account - we will NEVER (and we mean never) solicit any of your personal information via ANY means. If you get contacted by ANYONE claiming to be a UBI representative, ask for their extension (NOT their direct dial number), and call us directly at 860 747-4152.

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5 Tips to Keep Your Passwords Secret

Treat your passwords with as much care as you treat the information that they protect.
Use strong passwords to log on to your computer and to any site where you enter your credit card number, or any financial or personal information—including social networking sites.
 

  1. Never provide your password over e-mail or in response to an e-mail request.
    Internet "phishing" scams use fraudulent e-mail messages to entice you to reveal your user names and passwords, steal your identity, and more. Learn more about phishing scams and how to deal with online fraud.
  2. Do not type passwords on computers that you do not control.
    Computers such as those in Internet cafes, computer labs, kiosk systems, conferences, and airport lounges should be considered unsafe for any personal use other than anonymous Internet browsing. Cyber criminals can purchase keystroke logging devices which gather information typed on a computer, including passwords.
  3. Don't reveal passwords to others.
    Keep your passwords hidden from friends or family members (especially children) who could pass them on to other, less trustworthy individuals.
  4. Protect any recorded passwords.
    Don't store passwords on a file in your computer, because criminals will look there first. Keep your record of the passwords you use in a safe, secure place.
  5. Use more than one password
    Use different passwords for different Web sites and services.

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Responding to Calls, Emails, Mailed Notices, Texts, etc

Most Cyber-Criminals rely on fear of punishment to get you disclose your personal information. You may get an email saying your account has been frozen and you need to respond immediately to fix it. You may get a text saying your credit card has been breached and you need to provide information regarding it to identify yourself. You may get a mailed notice saying that there was an error on your account. You may get many forms of communication, and these communications may look extremely convincing. That is the point of them. To scare you into thinking there is a real error that you need to remedy right now.

In ALL cases, even legitimate ones, best practice is to call the listed number of the institution in questions and inquire as to whether or not there has been any breach of your information. When you call them, you eliminate the potential for fraudsters to get in between you and your institution. Never call the number on the correspondence or email. You'll likely be calling the fraudster. If you have been contacted by phone, get their name and their extension, and tell them you'll call them back at the main number.

As for UBI - we will NEVER (and we mean never) solicit any of your personal information via ANY means. If you get contacted by ANYONE claiming to be a UBI representative, ask for their extension (NOT their direct dial number), and call us directly at 860 747-4152.

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